Category Archives: Winkelmann

The Prielipp Family and the Prussian Explusion

In the Summer of 2013, I managed to track down a living descendant of Otto Prielipp, whom my great-grandfather had helped come to America. I had a suspicion at the time that his family and mine were related, a suspicion I have since been able to confirm. In fact, it is quite likely that the Prielipps are the reason that my great-great-grandfather Wilhelm Schmidt decided to come to America.

This living descendant, Donald Otto Prielipp (1929-2015), was my 3rd cousin twice removed.  His great-grandmother, Hanna Auguste Friedricke “Friedricke” Winkelmann (b 1839) was the sister of my 3x-great-grandmother Wilhelmine Winkelmann. She married Wilhelm Friedrich Julius Prielipp in the town of Karolina, Kris Czarnikau, Posen, Prussia on 14 Feb 1864. The couple had at least seven children in Karolina, Gornitz, and Stieglitz (all of which were very near each other). Whereas my branch of the family came to America in 1885 and 1892 and was thus spared the fury of the Red Army at the end of WWII and the subsequent Prussian Explusion (1945-1947), Donald’s family was not so fortunate. Here are his recollections of his family and their story, with additional details added from my research, as he related them to me during our phone conversation.

“My grandfather was Franz Wilhelm Hermann Prielipp, but he went by Hermann.  He was born in the town of Karolina, Kreis Czarnikau, Posen, Prussia on 31 Mar 1865 to Wilhelm Friedrich Julius Prielipp and Hanna Auguste Friedricke “Friedricke” Winkelmann.  Hermann’s wife was Emma Therese Osten, who was born in the town of Putzig, Kreis Czarnikau, Posen Prussia on 10 Jul 1866 to Carl Wilhelm Osten and his wife Henriette Quast.  Hermann and Emma were married on 29 Sept 1890 in the town of Grünfier, Kreis Carnikau, Posen, Prussia where Hermann was listed as an “eigenthümer”, or owner of a small farm.

Hermann was, indeed, a farmer in Gornitz and he owned about 10 acres of land between the small towns of Gornitz and Ascherbude. His father Wilhelm Friedrich Julius Prielipp had owned the land before him, and had built a house, a granary, a barn, and a storage barn on the property.  About 1/3 of the land was Scotch Pine, and they used it for firewood and lumber. Another acre of the land was the farm complex itself with the house and barns and so on. The rest of the land was in wheat, barley, and rye. Hermann worked the farm until he died.  He died in his field of a heart attack before World War 2.  Note: Hermann Prielipp died in Gornitz 25 Mar 1929, per his death record.

My father, Otto Karl Prielipp was born on the farm in Gornitz on 26 Jul 1904.  He had an older brother, Emil W Prielipp (b 26 Feb 1903), a younger brother, Walter Karl Prielipp (b 10 Jul 1907), and at least two other brothers, (Carl and Adolf), and a sister (Ida Hulda Prielipp, b 12 Sept 1899).  My father came to America in 1922 when he was 17 year old aboard the “SS Mount Carroll”.  Your great-great-grandfather Wilhelm Schmidt had arranged a job for him working in the paper mill in Rothschild, Wisconsin in the “beater room” with your great-grandfather Edwin Schmidt.  He married my mother, Lillian Mable Pfleiger, in Rothschild, Wisconsin on 5 May 1828, and we lived in Rothschild for many years.

After WWI the province of Posen where the Prielipps lived was given back to the Poles, but the Germans were not displaced and there were no problems with harassment or anything at all. Then when Germany began its rise to power in the 1930’s my dad’s mother wrote to him to ask him to come back to Gornitz. She said that there were lots of jobs and that the conditions were very good. My father Otto said, “no way”. He could see which way the political winds were blowing and wasn’t about to go back there.

At the end of WWII, the Red Army began to sweep through the Eastern Prussian provinces, pushing out the retreating Germans.  The troops had been encouraged to rape, pillage, murder, and destroy everything they could, and this extended to the German-speaking people living in those provinces.   The Russians came through Gornitz and killed almost all the male Germans.  My uncle Adolph was the eldest brother of the family and would have inherited the family farm from Hermann. The Russians tore the house apart and ripped the beds to shreds looking for money, and then they beat Adolph to death with their guns.

Adolph’s mother (Emma Therese Osten Prielipp) was ejected from the house in the middle of winter and they found her frozen to death on the side of the road.  This would have been around January, 1945.  Note: Emma Osten died in Gornitz on 18 Oct 1944 of old age, per her death record.  The Red Army was not near Gornitz at that time, so she could not have been the one killed as described.  Perhaps another woman in the family had her story conflated with Emma’s?

There was a Radtke family in the town, and Otto’s sister Ida Hulda Prielipp (b 12 Sept 1899) was married to Hermann Adolf Radtke. They had a daughter named Hilda Radtke.  I was friends with that family and every other year for 20 years either my family would go to Germany and visit them or the Radtkes would come to the US to visit us in Easton, Wisconsin.

Mr. Radtke was a principal, or superintendent of the school. He got in touch with Hilda, and then when the Prielipps went to Germany one year, they packed up and drove to Poland from the town of Volmersted where Hilda lived (probably Wolmirstedt, Börde, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany).  They showed us around their area and we got to know their family very well. Four years later when we went back to Germany, we all went first to Volmerstead, and from there to Gornitz. We spent a week in Gornitz about 1980. It was an interesting linguistic exercise. Our guide was a Hungarian man, who knew German. Fritz knew German and English. We only knew English. Every conversation was three or four languages translated back and forth. That’s how we learned the history of our grandparents and uncles. There was nothing left of Gornitz when we went there. Some private residences remained that were occupied by Polish people.

With the guide who knew Polish and Hungarian and German we could visit with those people and they were very hospitable. With the people from the Radtke family, we all spent 2-3 hours with them and they were very agreeable, and we could ask any questions about our family’s stay in Gornitz.

Then we went to the farm where my father Otto grew up on, where his father Hermann had farmed. Hermann’s father Wilhelm Prielipp had lived on the farm after the first World War, and he was badly crippled from a fall off a ladder off one of the buildings, so he looked like a question mark, all hunched over. He couldn’t work, but he could shuffle around. He lived in the grainary. They had built him a kind of an apartment in there. He and his wife lived in it. When Hermann’s father was young he went to Russia and worked in logging, and did river drives.  Eventually he took over the farm in Gornitz.

Hermann had an older brother named Adolph. There was also a brother Carl and one other brother. One of those brothers was killed in WWI.  Then there was Emil and Otto, and a younger son named Walter.  Walter fought in the german army, was captured by the French, and in a French prisoner of war camp when the allies came through France at the end of WWII.  Emil and Otto brought Walter to the United States and he lived with Otto’s family for a period of time and looked for work and finally found work in Milwaukee, so he went to Milwaukee and worked in a leather tanning factory and was married and has since died. He never had any children.

Emil had three kids. His son Robert was a mathematician and taught at a college in Wisconsin. He had no children. Second son was named Ronald. He was also a mathematician who taught at University of Kansas in Salinas. He still lives there.  He married a woman named Beth, and they have no children. Ronald’s legs don’t work, so he’s in a wheelchair. He lives in a full-care facility. Beth is trying to sell the house. She plans to join him at the facility. Their third son was Walter. He went west and worked for Boeing in Seattle.  He was married with no children, and his wife is a union activist, she’s involved in politics in Washington. Walter died in 2009.

In terms of my immediate family, my brother Russell Prielipp is retired. He and his wife Bonnie have no children. They live in NJ and are doing relatively well. Our sister Marian Prielipp Doddington works for a design firm in Washington DC.”

Donald mentioned that he had an article on the death of his grandfather Hermann Prielipp. It’s in German and gives the date of his death. He was going to try to find it for me, but he passed away before that happened. He also mentioned that he helped build the home of my mother’s first cousin Gloria Johnson on Grand Avenue in Wausau, Wisconsin. This home was right next door to my great-grandparents’ house (Edwin Schmidt and Olga Hanson).

DonaldPrielippFace

Donald Prielipp

Donald passed away on 23 Feb 2015 in Redding, California.  He was 85 years old.


Marriage Record for Christian Karl and Amelie Schmidt – 28 Mar 1891

It has always been my suspicion that my 3x great-grandfather Carl Friedrich Schmidt died in Posen, Prussia about 1892.  His only son, Wilhelm (my great-great-grandfather), came to America in 1885, and then seven years later, the entire rest of the family (his mother, his five sisters, a brother-in-law, and two nephews) emigrated to Weston, Wisconsin to join him.  The most likely explanation for the sudden migration of the rest of the family was that the father had died and there was no longer anyone to run the family farm (Friedrich had been described as a “Kolonist” or land-owning farmer in all the documents we had for him). Given that the youngest child in the family, Augusta Bertha Schmidt, was born in 1880 in Gornitz, Posen, Prussia (according to her birth documents), and given that the family had listed the town of Gornitz as their “place of last residence” on the passenger list coming to America in 1892, I had every reason to believe that Friedrich Schmidt died between 1880 and 1892 in Gornitz.  I had had one of my collaborators in Poland look for his death record, but she was unable to locate it despite finding many other records for the family in the archives.

Bertha Schmidt & Wilhelmine Winkelmann, 1895

Bertha Schmidt & Wilhelmine Winkelmann, 1895

Then, about two months ago, I had a realization.   Friedrich Schmidt’s daughter Amelie Schmidt had married Christian Karl in Stieglitz, Posen, Prussia in 1891.  Her twin sons were born three months later in Stieglitz.  If I could obtain the marriage record, it would say whether Friedrich Schmidt was living or deceased at the time of the marriage.  If he were deceased, we’d know he died between 1880 and 1891. But if he were living, we’d know he died between March 1891 and April 1892 when the family started emigrating to America.

Amelia Schmidt

Amelia Schmidt

I asked another of my collaborators, Lukasz Bielecki, to look for the marriage record the next time he was in the national archives in Pila, Poland.  After some time, he was able to find the record, and it turned out to be more valuable than I had imagined. Here’s the document [click to enlarge or download].  A translation follows:

Karl / Schmidt Marriage, p1

Karl / Schmidt Marriage, p1

Karl / Schmidt Marriage, p2

Karl / Schmidt Marriage, p2

Stieglitz the 28th of March 1891 Before the registrar, for the purpose of marriage, appeared the laborer (Arbeiter) Christian Karl, of known identity, evangelical religion, born the 29th April, 1863 in Woltin, Kreis Greifenhagen (Pommern), resident of Klebow, Kreis Greifenhagen (Pommern), son of the laborer (Arbeiter) Daniel Karl and his wife Regine née Seeger, both residents of Klebow, and Emilie Franziska Schmidt, unmarried, of known identity, evangelical religion, born the 18th of January 1869 in Karolina, Kreis Czarnikau, resident of Stieglitz, Kreis Czarnikau, daughter of cottager (Häusler) Friedrich Schmidt and his wife Wilhelmine née Winkelmann, both residents of Stieglitz. The following witnesses were published: 3. The Häusler Ferdinand Schmidt, 46 years old, resident of Stieglitz, 4. and the laborer Gustav Wehrmann, 24 years old, resident of Stieglitz. Read over, approved and signed by:

Christian Karl
Emilie Franziska Karl née Schmidt
Ferdinand Schmidt
Gustav Wehrmann

Notarized in agreement with the main register in Steiglitz, the 28th of March 1891

There are many things to discuss here.  First of all, Christian Karl was from Pomerania (Pommern), the part of Prussia near the Baltic Sea where Germany meets Poland today.  In fact, he was still a resident of Pomerania at the time of his marriage.  The Krueger and Kamrath branches of my family were from this same area.  This map shows the towns the Karl family came from.  Klebow is near the top, and Woltin is in the center.

Kreis Griefenhagen showing Woltin and Klebow.

Kreis Griefenhagen showing Woltin and Klebow.

The next important bit of information was that Friedrich Schmidt was, indeed, still alive in March, 1891.  This all but confirms the theory that his death was the reason the family emigrated to America the next year.  More surprisingly, Friedrich and his wife Wilhelmine Winkelmann were both living in Steiglitz at the time of the marriage, not in Gornitz as previously thought.  When Wilhelm Schmidt finished his journeyman carpenter travels in Germany, he returned home to Gornitz, so the Schmidt family was living there at least until 1885.  This means the family moved from Gornitz to Stieglitz (about 3.3 miles West) between 1885 and 1891, then they moved back to Gornitz after Friedrich’s death (remember they listed Gornitz as their residence on their immigration documents).

Map showing Gornitz and Stieglitz

Map showing Karolina, Gornitz, and Stieglitz (near the bottom of the map)

Friedrich is listed as a “Häusler”, or cottager, on the document where in all other previous documents he had been listed as a “Kolonist”, or farmer who owned his own farm.  Basically it means he owned a home with a small bit of land for his own use, and implies he had given up farming.  Thirdly, you will note that one of the witnesses to the marriage was 47-year old Ferdinand Schmidt from Steiglitz.  I was able to subsequently confirm from Poznan Project marriage records that this Ferdinand Schmidt was Friedrich’s younger brother:

Schmidt / Dietert Marriage, 1874

Schmidt / Dietert Marriage, 1874

#7) Marriage of the journeyman carpenter [Zimmergesell] and bachelor Ferdinand Schmidt, age 30, from Stieglitz, son of the deceased property-owner [Eigenthümer] Ludwig Schmidt from Stieglitz, and Miss Wilhelmine Dietert, 22 years old, from Stieglitz, daughter of the deceased master blacksmith (Schmiedemeister) Gottleib Dietert from Stieglitz, Consent for groom: No need for parents’ or guardian’s (Vormund) consent, because groom is of legal or full age (majorenn) according to certificate of baptism. Consent for bride: Guardian’s consent. Neither bride nor groom has been married previously. Marriage Date: 24 Apr 1874.

With this new information a new narrative emerges.  Friedrich Schmidt and his wife Wilhelmine Winkelmann had been farming in Karolina, Posen, Prussia between 1865 and 1872 where their daughters Alvine, Amelie, and Antonie were born.  They then moved to the nearby town of Gornitz, and were living there between 1875 and 1880 when their daughters Pauline and Bertha were born.  They then seem to have given up farming and moved West to Stieglitz at some point between 1885 and 1891.  Friedrich’s brother Ferdinand had been living there since at least 1874, so perhaps Friedrich wanted to be closer to him.  It’s also possible that Friedrich had fallen ill and could no longer do the work required to stay on the farm. Sometime about 1882 or 1883 Wilhelm Schmidt leaves home to become a journeyman carpenter, quite possibly because his Uncle Ferdinand Schmidt had been one, then emigrates to America in 1885 where he soon marries and settles down in Weston, Wisconsin.  Sometime between March 1891 and March 1892 Friedrich Schmidt dies, most likely in Stieglitz.  His newly-widowed wife, Wilhelmine Winkelmann, moves the family back to Gornitz at that point, perhaps to have the support of family or friends in her former home town.  (The Winkelmann family lived in Stieglitz and Karolina, which were both very close to Gornitz.)  Upon learning the news that his father had passed away unexpectedly (Friedrich Schmidt was only 57), son Wilhelm sends the money back to allow his five sisters, his brother-in-law Christian Karl, his two nephews (Amelie and Christian had twin boys in 1891) and his mother, to come to America and join him in Weston, Wisconsin. I am having Lukasz look for Friedrich’s death record in Stieglitz, now that we have a place and a very specific date range.  I hope to have more to add to the story of the Schmidt family in Posen, Prussia very soon.

Wilhhelm Schmidt with his mother and five sisters in 1893.

Wilhelm Schmidt with his mother and five sisters in 1893.


Ancestry.com DNA Testing

For Christmas this year, I decided that I wanted to get my mother and father DNA-tested through Ancestry.com.  While it’s true that my family tree is extremely well-elucidated and researched, there are still pockets where certain things are unclear.  For example, I only know back to my 3x great-grandparents on my Krueger side (due to records from Pomerania being difficult to find and the common nature of the family name), so if we matched someone in the world who had Krueger ancestors it would indicate a link between those families despite the absence of documentation.  Similar situations are present for many of the Irish lines of my family due to the scarcity of records from Ireland.

So at Christmas this year my mother spit into a test-tube and sent off an envelope to be analyzed.   Yesterday we got the results back.

My mother’s DNA matched at least 20 people “closely” (5th cousins or better).  I’ll have to investigate each one!

It showed that she has 19% DNA from Scandanavia (that would be the Norwegian side, Hanson and Olson), 32% “Europe East”, which would be the Prussian stuff (Krueger, Hoge, Schmidt, Zierke, Schulz, Winkelmann).  Then 38% from “Great Britain”.  I assume this is the Irish from the Mullins, Hammond, and all the British stuff from the Curtis side of my family.  Then there’s 9% of the DNA marked “Other”.

I have no idea how much confidence to give these results.  I know from my research that my mother’s grandparents break down as follows:

Oscar Krueger: 100% Prussian
Edith Curtis: 50% Irish and 50% English
Olga Hanson: 100% Norwegian
Edwin Schmidt: 100% Prussian

So my maternal grandfather was 50% Prussian, 25% Irish, 25% English, and my maternal grandmother was 50% Norwegian and 50% Prussian.  That makes my mother 50% Prussian, 25% Irish/English, and 25% Norwegian.  The DNA results have much more “Great Britain” than predicted.  No idea what that means.

On the Schmidt side of my mother’s family there was a family rumor that someone in the family brought back and married a “Mongolian Princess”.  Interestingly, my mother’s DNA shows 2% of her genetics are from “Asia Central” which is the area around Turkmenistan and Northern Iran.  Very interesting!

Here’s the full breakdown of her results:

Great Britain 38%
Europe East 32%
Scandinavia 19%
Ireland 4%
Europe West 4%
Asia Central 2%
Finland/Northwest Russia 1%

As time goes on and other people are tested, we can see if more matches are found.


Parish Records from Kreis Griefenberg, Pommern, Prussia

Just a place to do spot-checks of parishes in Kreis Grifenberg. These records are available online here: https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-18355-6961-47?cc=1874205&wc=M94Y-7PY:510545547#uri=https%3A%2F%2Ffamilysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fwaypoint%2FM94Y-74L%3An1027665417%3Fcc%3D1874205

Evangelische Kirche Batzwitz: Barkow, Batzwitz, Lebbin, Vahnerow: 1822-1874 (455 pages)
Spot-checked.  Krueger records noted.  Winkelmann records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Batzwitz: Barkow, Batzwitz, Vahnerow, Lebbin: 1817-1845 (130 pages)
Spot-checked.

Evangelische Kirche Batzwitz: Kaldemanz, Rensin, Batzwitz: 1841-1873 (71 pages)
Spot-checked.

Evangelische Kirche Batzwitz: Koldemanz, Rensin: 1817-1865 (202 pages)
Spot-checked. Strehlow records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Behlkow: 1786-1860 (487 pages), 1861-1874
Spot-checked. Hoge records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Behlkow: Wischow: 1841-1854
No spot-checking for years given.

Evangelische Kirche Görke: 1811-1850
Spot-checked.

Evangelische Kirche Görke: Ruhleben: 1830-1874 (611 pages)
Spot-checked. Hoge records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Greifenberg
Spot-checked. Krueger records noted. Hoge records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Gützlaffshagen
Spot-checked. Strehlow records noted. Hoge records noted. Krueger records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Hoff: 1806-1874 (713 pages)
Spot-checked. Hoge records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Karnitz
Spot-checked.

Evangelische Kirche Klötkow: 1810-1874 (534 pages)
Spot-checked. Krueger records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Langenhagen: 1810-1864 (639 pages); 1865-1874 (116 pages)
Spot-checked.

Evangelische Kirche Radduhn: 1811-1874 (335 pages)
Spot-checked.

Evangelische Kirche Rensekow 1812-1874 (505 pages)
Spot-checked. Hoge records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Ribbekardt: 1824-1874 (575 pages)
Spot-checked. Krüger records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Ribbekardt: Dorphagen: 1824-1860 (350 pages)
Spot-checked. Krüger records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Robe: 1810-1855; 1856-1874 (292 pages)
Spot-checked. Krüger records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Rottnow: 1838-1874 (369 pages)
Spot-checked. Krüger records noted. Not all years are in order.

Evangelische Kirche Sellin: nur Zicker, Neklatz, Dadow: 1824-1874 (309 pages)
Spot-checked. Hoge records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Triebs: 1810-1864 (257 pages); 1824-1874 (126 pages)
Spot checked. Minimal Kruger records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Zarben: 1835-1874 (710 pages)
Spot Checked. Hoge records noted. Kruger records noted. Strehlow records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Zarben: Hagenow
Wrong dates for spot-check (starts in June). Krüger records noted, Strehlow records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Zedlin: 1810-1874 (434 pages)
Hoge records noted. Krüger records noted.

Evangelische Kirche Zirkwitz: 1834-1838 (68 Pages); 1811-1874 (802 pages)
Spot-checked. Krueger records noted. Hoge records noted.


More Winkelmann Family Records from Prussia

Marlena has sent me several more batches of documents.  I’m going to summarize them here in chronological order:

Birth Date: 24 Nov 1839, Friedeberg, Stillborn Daughter, born at 6:00 am, daughter of Christian Friedrich Grünewaldt & Karoline Wilhelmine Winkelmann.

Birth Date: 4 Dec 1839, Schönefeldt, Christian Friedrich Winkelmann, born at 2:00 in the afternoon, son of Wilhelm Winkelmann and Anna?? Friedricke Bok?.

Birth Date: 18 Oct 1857, Schönlanke, Emil Rudolph, son of Ludwig Winkelmann & Johanne Spinde? Baptized 4 Nov 1857.  Godparents: Wilhelm Spletts, Emilie Wegner.

Birth Date: 31 Mar 1865, Carolina, Franz Wilhelm Hermann, son of Wilh. Prielipp and Hann. Aug. Friedke. Winkelmann.  Baptized on 12 Apr 1865.  Godparents: Gottlieb Winkelmann & Mrs. Wilh. Schmidt [This is my 3x great-grandmother!].

Birth Date: Nov. 10 1865, Carolina, Alvine Bertha daughter of Friedrich Schmidt, Kolonist, and Wilh. Winkelmann, Baptized on 26 Nov 1865.  Godparents: Wilh. Prielipp & Antonia Winkelmann.
Marriage Date: 6 Apr 1866.  Mischke.  Carl Julius Winkelmann, age 25 [b1841], from Schönlanke and Miss Marie Emilie Louise Buchholtz, age 20, daughter of Gottlieb Buchholtz, were married.

Birth Date: 11 Aug 1866, Carolina, Carl Friedrich Julius son of Wilh. Prielipp, kolonist, and Friedricke Winkelmann.  Baptized 19 Aug 1866.  Godparents: Friedrich Quast & Wilh. Hübstien.

Birth Date: Aug 31 1866, Ludwig Richard, son of Heinrich Winkelmann and Hilda Alvine Luther?   Baptized 1 Oct? 1866.  Witnesses: Richard Luther & Julianne Winkelmann.

Birth Date: Nov 4 1866, Johanna Bertha, daughter of Heinrich Winkelmann and Hilda Luther?  Baptized 25 Nov 1866.  Witnesses: Julius Winkelmann & Louise Wagner.

Nr. 76.  Schönlanke.  To the butcher Julius Winkelmann and Louise Bucholtz, a son Albert Heinrich Winkelmann, born 21 Nov 1866 and baptized 21 Nov 1866.  Witnesses: Ludwig Pantow & Henriette Borgmann.

Nr. 80.  Schönlanke.  Death of Albert Heinrich Winkelmann, age 4 months, son of the butcher Julius Winkelmann and Louise Buchholtz on 28 Nov 1866 from schwäche (weakness).

Carolina.  Birth Date: 12 Jan 1868.  Friedrich Wilhelm Franz, son of Julius Winkelmann, carpenter, and Wilhelmine Dumke, both evangelical religion.  Baptized on 16 Feb 1868.  Sponsors: Friedrich Schmidt, Franz Winkelmann, Antonie Winkelmann.

Birth Date: 29 Aug 1868, [Town??], Heinrich Max, son of Heinrich Winkelmann, and Hulda Ludner.  Baptized on the 20th Sept.  Sponsers: August Weise & Auguste Winkelmann.

Stieglitz.  Birth Date: 2 Jul 1869.  Anna Auguste, daughter of the kolonist Wilhelm Prielipp and Friedericke née Winkelmann, both evangelical religion.  Baptized on the 18th of July.  Sponsors: Franz Winkelmann, Louise Prielipp, Fried. Huldscher?.

Carolina.  Birth Date: 19 Sept 1869.  Hermann Julius Ernst, son of Julius Winkelmann and Wilhelmine née Dumke both evangelical religion.  Baptized on 17th Oct.  Sponsors: Franz Winkelmann, Bertha Dumke, August Heinst.

Marriage Date: 19 Mar 1871, Stieglitz, Marriage of the bachelor journeyman carpenter Franz Winkelmann with Miss Bertha Ohst.  Groom’s age: 23 years 6 mos.  Bride’s age: 21 years.  Bans published Mar 3, Mar 12, Mar 19.

Marriage Date: 19 Mar 1871, Stieglitz, Marriage of Ludwig Gustav Neumann with Antonie Winkelmann.  Age of groom: 22 years.  Age of bride: 20 years.  Bans published Jan 29, Feb 2, Feb 12.

Birth Date: 11 Oct 1871, Carolina, Baptism of Marie Pauline on 15 Oct 1871, daughter of Wilhelm Prielipp, kolonist, and Friedericke née Winkelmann.  Sponsors: Auguste Ruart & Ferdinand Prielipp.

Birth Date: 25 Oct 1871, Carolina, Baptism of Emil Gustav on 5 Nov 1871, son of Wilhelm Winkelmann, and Emilie née Marquardt.  Sponsors: Wilhelm Wehrmann & Pauline Standt.

Birth Date: 7 Nov 1871, Carolina, Baptism of Julius Ernst on 26 Nov 1871, son of Julius Winkelmann, kolonist, and Wilhelmine née Domke [Dumke].  Sponsors: Miss Bertha Domke [Dumke], Kolonist Eduard Buchholtz, Miss Pauline Winkelmann.

Birth Date: 31 Aug 1874, Carolina, Baptism of Gustav Edouard on 7 Sept 1874, son of Julius Winkelmann, kolonist, and Wilhelmine née Dumke.  Sponsors: Miss Johanne Buscholz, Miss Pauline Winkelmann, Mr. Gustav Dumke.

No. 93.  Runau, 18 May 1876.  Appeared in person before the registrar: the “Altsitzer” [retired farmer living on the farm after a change of ownership, e.g. to his son] Johann Dumke, resident in Carolina and indicated that Wilhelmine Winkelmann, née Dumke, evangel. religion, spouse of the kolonist Julius Winkelmann, evang. religion, resident with her husband in Carolina has given birth to a female child at home in Carolina, on May 12th of the year 1876, 4 p.m. The child’s name is Wilhelmine Bertha. The above mentioned Dumke said he was present at birth.  At the bottom a hand-written entry says: Died on 2 Feb 1943, No 217/1943, Schönlanke, Schultz [registrar].

26 Jun 1891, Schönlanke.  The undersigned registrar stated that the known person Johanna Buchholz, née Priebisch, midwife, resident of Schoenlanke, appeared and stated that Alvine Winkelmann, née Krause, wife of Adolf Winkelmann, evangelical religion resident with her husband in Schoenlanke on the 24th June in the year one thousand eight hundred ninety-one gave birth to a son named Richard Max.  Signed and Attested Johanna Buchholz née Priebisth, signed by registrar.

25 Apr 1893, Schönlanke.  The undersigned registrar stated that the known person Johanna Buchholz, née Priebisch, midwife, resident of Schoenlanke, appeared and stated that Alvine Winkelmann, née Krause, wife of Adolf Winkelmann, evangelical religion resident with her husband in Schoenlanke on the 23rd April in the year one thousand eight hundred ninety-three gave birth to a son named Fritz Erich.  Signed and Attested Johanna Buchholz née Priebisth, signed by registrar.

6 Jan 1894, Stieglitz.  Emma Winkelmann née Warnke resident of Stieglitz reports the death of her husband the gastwirt Ludwig Winkelmann, 40 years 1 month old, evangelical religion, resident of Stieglitz, born in Stieglitz, Kreis Czarnikau, on 1 November 1853. Son of August Winkelman and Wilhelmine née Steinke, both of Stieglitz, on the 5th of January, 1894.  Attested and signed, Emma Winkelmann. Schultz, registrar.

30 Aug 1898, Schoenlanke.  The undersigned registrar stated that the known person Veronika Lemke, née Garek, midwife, resident of Schoenlanke, appeared and stated that Therese Winkelmann, née Zarbock, wife of the carpenter Gustav Winkelmann, evangelical religion, resident with her husband in Schoenlanke on the 27th August in the year one thousand eight hundred ninety-eight gave birth to a son named Ernst Julius.  Signed and Attested Veronika Lemke, signed by registrar.

14 Aug 1899, Schoenlanke.  The undersigned registrar stated that the known person Johanna Buchholz, née Priebisch, midwife, resident of Schoenlanke, appeared and stated that Therese Winkelmann, née Zarbock, wife of the carpenter Gustav Winkelmann, evangelical religion, resident with her husband in Schoenlanke on the 8th August in the year one thousand eight hundred ninety-nine gave birth to a daughter named Frieda Elizabeth.  Signed and Attested Johanna Buchholz née Priebisch, signed by registrar.

12 Mar 1900, Schoenlanke.  Before the undersigned registrar published today the known personage the district midwife [Bezirkshebamme] Anna Quast née Breitkreutz resident of the city of Schoenlanke [Stadt Schönlanke] ____ religion, appeared and indicated that the Bertha Warnke née Winkelmann wife of the lumberjack [Holzarbeiter] Carl Warnke, both of evangelical religion, resident of Schoenlanke, gave birth in her residence in on the 12th of March in the year one thousand nine hundred at 2:00 am to a female child who was given the name Emma Erna Frieda.  Signed and attested by Anna Quast and the registrar.  [Written in lower left] “H.  geheiratet  Nr. 1088 / 34  Berlin Neukölln 1”, perhaps indicating that Emma married in Berlin Neukölln in 1934?

20 Nov 1900, Schoenlanke.  The undersigned registrar stated that the known person Johanna Buchholz, née Priebisch, midwife, resident of Schoenlanke, appeared and stated that Therese Winkelmann, née Zarbock, wife of the carpenter Gustav Winkelmann, evangelical religion, resident with her husband in Schoenlanke on the 14th November in the year one thousand nine hundred gave birth to a daughter named Johanna Meta Emma.  Ms. Buchholz stated that she was with Mrs. Winkelmann for the birth.  Signed and Attested Johanna Buchholz née Priebisch, signed by registrar.  [At the bottom right is written: H:  Eine Tochter geb.  Nr. 1757  1920  Berlin 9  H:  Tochter geh.  Nr. 4753 / 39  Berlin,  Horst Wessel (?)]  “A daughter born #1757 in 1920 in Berlin.  Daughter married #4753/39 in Berlin, Horst Wessel”.


A Remarkable Baptism Record

I was very excited to receive this document from my Polish contact, Marlena.  It shows the birth of my great-great grand-aunt Antonie Schmidt in the town of Karolina, Posen, Prussia.  [Click to enlarge or download]:

Baptism Record, Karolina, Posen, Prussia, 1872

Baptism Record, Karolina, Posen, Prussia, 1872

Translation:

31 Aug 1872, birth of Antonie Wilhelmine, baptized on 8 Sept 1872, daughter of Friedrich Schmidt, kolonist, and Wilhelmine née Winkelmann.  Sponsors: Miss Pauline Winkelmann, Mrs. Wilhelmine Winkelmann, Mr. Gustav Elftmann.

[The “Miss Pauline Winkelmann” mentioned as a sponsor was my 3x great-grandmother’s sister Marie Pauline Winklemann, b 6 Apr 1855.  The Mrs. Wilhelmine Winkelmann is likely my 3x great-grandmother’s sister-in-law, Wilhelmine Dumke (1843-1929) who married her brother Christian Friedrich Julius “Julius” Winkelmann.]

What I didn’t notice at first was that two lines above that is an entry for a child born to Wilhelmine Winkelmann’s brother Franz Winkelmann:

17 Aug 1872, birth of Auguste Marie Louise, baptized on 8 Sept 1872, daughter of Franz Winkelmann, kolonist, and Bertha née Ohst.  Sponsors: Miss Emilie Ohst, Miss Auguste Pompton, Miss Auguste Elftmann.

Auguste Marie Louise Winkelmann and Antonie Schmidt were first cousins and were baptized together.  Mr. Elftmann was a sponsor of Antoine, Miss Elftmann was a sponsor of Auguste Marie [siblings?].  This indicates that the two families had friends in common, etc.  I think this shows how close my family was with the family of my cousin Doris Winkelmann Sonntag, who is a descendant of Franz Winkelmann and Bertha Ohst.  The “Miss Emilie Ohst” listed on the second record is very likely from her family also.


Schmidt Immigrant Obituaries

I thought it would be a good idea to put a blog up with the obituaries that I have for the “Schmidt Immigrants”.

Wilhhelm Schmidt with his mother and five sisters in 1893.

Wilhhelm Schmidt with his mother and five sisters in 1893.

The matriarch, Wilhelmine Winkelmann (1836 – 1914), who married Carl Friedrich Schmidt:

Wilhelmine Winkelmann, 1914

Wilhelmine Winkelmann, 1914

Carl Ernst Wilhelm “William” Schmidt (1862 – 1925) who married Ottilie Zierke:

Wilhelm Schmidt Obit, 1925

Wilhelm Schmidt Obit, 1925

Alvine Schmidt (1865-1942), who married Wilhelm Mueller:

Alvine Schmidt Mueller Obit

Alvine Schmidt Mueller Obit, 1942

Amelia “Emilie” Schmidt (1869 – 1932), who married Christian Karl:

Amelie Schmidt Karl Obiit, 1932

Amelie Schmidt Karl Obiit, 1932

Antonie “Antonia” Schmidt (1872 – 1951), who married Theodore Beste:

Here is the text from the San Mateo Times December 10, 1951, page 19

ANTONIA BESTE

Mrs. Antonia Beste, 79, the mother of Mrs. Ruth Hicks of 421 Aargon boulevard, San Mateo, died this morning at her daughter’s home. A native of Posen, Germany, she had lived in San Mateo 8 years. She was a member of the Grace Lutheran church of San Mateo and the Royal Neighbors of Schofield, Wis.  The widow of Theodore Beste, she is survived, in addition to her daughter, by two grandchildren, Judy and Jim Hicks of San Mateo.  Funeral services will be held at the Grace Lutheran church tomorrow at 2 p.m. Interment will follow at St. John’s cemetery, San Mateo. Friends may call at the Crosby-N Gray mortuary in Burlingame until noon tomorrow.

Auguste Pauline “Lena” Schmidt (1875 – 1953) who married Peter Blanchard Little:

Wausau Daily Herald, 8 Sept 1958, p6.

Wausau Daily Herald, 8 Sept 1958, p6.

Here is the text from her obituary in the Rhinelander Daily News September 9, 1953, page 2:

Mrs. Lena Little Dies in Wausau

Funeral services will be held at 10 a. m. Thursday in a Wausau funeral home and at 1 p. m. Thursday in St. Peter’s Lutheran Church at Schofield for Mrs. Lena Little, 77, of Rothschild, former well-known resident of Minocqua, who died Labor Day [Sept 7] in Wausau. Burial will be in the Minocqua cemetery late Thursday afternoon. Mrs. Little, born Nov. 25. 1875, in Germany, came to this country in 1892 and was married in 1896 in Minocqua to Peter Little, who died 20 years ago. They lived in Minocqua for 30 years, during which time her husband operated a tavern and barber shop. Mrs. Little had resided in Rothschild and Schofield for the last 21 years. Survivors include a daughter-in-law, Mrs. Ernest Little, with whom she made her home in Rothschild, several nieces and nephews, and a granddaughter, Karen Little, of Rothschild.

Auguste Bertha “Bertha” Schmidt (1880 – 1946), who married Joseph Schneider:

Bertha Schmidt Obit, 1946

Bertha Schmidt Obit, 1946


Winkelmann Records from Chodziez, Posen, Prussia

Just noting here some other records for the Winklemann family that were sent to me by Marlena Krzemińska from Chodziez Parish. I don’t know how they fit into the picture quite yet.


Record: 50
Date of birth: 19th February 1822
Time of birth: 4:00am
Location: Krumke [Kreis Kolmar, Posen, Prussia]
Name: Johann Andreas
Christening: 24 February 1822
Person performing ceremony: Krüger
Father: Michael Winkelmann
Mother: Dorothea née Mesturs ?
Religion: evang. / evang.
Father’s occupation: ??
Occupation of godfather: ??
Godfather: Andreas Schwantes
Godmother: Beate Louise Schwantes née Propp
Son born to married couple [box checked]


Record number: 2
Date: 10 January 1841
Official: Schulz
Details: The einwohner (resident) Johann Michael Winkelmann of Rattay, son of the einwohner Michael Winkelmann with the maiden Anna Louise Lemspfeil of Rattay, daughter of the deceased resident Paul Lemspfeil.
Ages: his 20 years 9 mos [b Apr. 1820], 26 years 10 mos [b Mar 1815].
Religion: evang. / evang.


Record number: 267
Date of birth: 23 November 1841
Hour of birth: 5:00
Male child #114 [in the registry]
Location: Rattay [Rattai, Kolmar, Posen, Prussia]
Date of christening: 5 December [1841]
Name: August Ferdinand
Person performing religious ritual: Schultz
Father: August Ferdinand Winkelmann
Mother: Anna Louise Sennpfeil
Religion of mother & father: evang. / evang.
Trade of father: Godparents: Joh. Weidemann, bachelor, Joh. Rädel, bachelor, Au. Flörke, maiden


Record: 12
Date: 12th of January 1844
Person performing ceremony: Schultz
Details: The einwohner (resident) Johann Andres Winkelmann of Rattay [Rattai, Kolmar, Posen, Prussia] son of the resident Michael Winkelmann, bachelor, with the maiden Anna Elizabeth Hübner of Rattay, daughter of the deceased carpenter? Andreas Hübner.


Record number: 267
Date: 4th Oct 1844
Time: 11am
Index: 112th female
Place: Rattay
Baptism Date: 10 October
Name: Wilhelmine Winkelmann
Official: Grützmacher
Father: Johann Andreas Winkelmann
Mother: Anna Louise Hübner
Religion: evang./evang.
Trade of father: Einwohner (resident)
Sponsors: Ludw. Rädel, einwohner; Gottlieb Hübner, ??; ?? Papke ??


Record number: 21
Date of birth: 15 January 1845
Hour of birth: 5:00
Male child #8 [in the registry]
Location: Chodzieren [Chodziez, Kolmar, Posen, Prussia]
Date of christening: 20 January [1845]
Name: Adolph Otto Ferdinand
Official: Schultz
Father: Julius Winkelmann
Mother: Charlotte Mielke
Religion of mother & father: evang. / evang.
Trade of father: Godparents: Wilh. Müller, Aug. Ginsch, Ferd. Krüger


Record number: 40
Date of death: 14 February 1849
Location: Oblesnitz [Ober Lesnitz, Kolmar, Posen, Prussia]
Name of deceased: Eva Winkelmann
Age: 35 years [born 1814]
Trade or profession: Unmarried woman
Profession of father: Einwohner (resident)
Name of father: Michael Winkelmann
Name of mother: Anna Marie Kipek
Registry number: 22nd [female]
Disease or cause of death: Name of person performing religious rites:


Record number: 178
Date of birth: 19 July 1849
Time of birth: 5:00 am
Index: 69th female
Place of birth: Chodzisen [Chodziez]
Date of christening: 24 July
Name: Louise Charlotte Winkelmann
Official: Schultz
Father: Julius Ferdinand Winkelmann
Mother: Charlotte Wilhelmeine Mielke
Religion: evang. / evang.
Father’s occupation: ??
Godparents: Ferd. Schwantes, ??; Carol Giefer, ??; Wilh. Müller ??


Record number: 221
Date of birth: 23 August 1849
Time of birth: 1:00 pm
Index: 127th male
Place of birth: Schloss Varwork ??
Date of christening: 9 September 1849
Name: Johann Gottlieb
Official: Schultz
Father: Johann Andreas Winkelmann
Mother: Anna Elizabeth Hübner
Religion: evang. / evang.
Father’s occupation: einwohner [resident]
Godparents: M? Hübner, resident; Wilhelm Radtke, resident


No. 22
Date: April 1850
Official: Schultz
The resident Johann Michael Winkelmann of Krumke with Anna Rosina Schmidt of Strehlitz, daugher of Johann Schmidt.
Age of groom: 30 yrs
Age of bride: 21 yrs 2 mos
Religion: evang. / evang.


Record 76
Date: 8 May 1851
Place: Rattay
Name: Michael Winkelmann
Age: 80
Trade: Einwohner (resident)
Trade of father: Einwohner (resident)
Name of father: Winkelmann
Name of mother: Unknown
Index: 40th male
Cause of death: ??
Reporting pastor: Wilhelm Nicolai

 


Birth Record for Auguste Pauline Schmidt – 1875

The birth record for another of the fabled “Schmidt Sisters”.

This document comes courtesy of Marlena Krzeminska, who found it in the state archive in Pila, Poland.   It is exciting because it shows that the Schmidt family was in Gornitz, Posen, Prussia in 1875, five years earlier than we had known before.

Translation:

No. 215
Runau the 6th December 1875

Before the undersigned registrar appeared today the known person the “Eigenthümer” [property owner, or owner of a farm] Friedrich Schmidt, resident of Gornitz, evangelical religion, who stated that Wilhelmine Schmidt née Winkelmann, his wife, evangelical religion, resident with him in Gornitz has given birth on the morning of 25th of November, one thousand eight hundred and seventy five to a female child named Auguste Pauline.

Signed and attested, Friedrich Schmidt, and the registrar.

Auguste Pauline Schmidt Birth, 1875

Auguste Pauline Schmidt Birth, 1875


The (Short) Life and Death of Otto Paul Winkelmann

The deluge of documents from Posen, Prussia continued unabated this week.  This is a good problem to have!

I’m in the midst of trying to put all the bits and pieces together into a coherent story, but at this point there are several items that have only speculative placement in the family tree.  I know enough to be certain that they relate to my family, but there are bits of information missing such that I can’t say for certain exactly how the information fits into the larger picture.  What I’m doing at this point is putting the information into my tree where I suspect it belongs, along with a note about why I suspect it goes there and what information is needed to confirm or refute my suspicion.

Such is the case with the (short) life and death of Otto Paul Winkelmann.  Otto Paul was born on the 14th of August in 1878.  Here is his birth record [click to enlarge or download]:

Otto Paul Winkelmann Birth, 1878

Otto Paul Winkelmann Birth, 1878

Translation:

No. 154, Runau, 18 August 1878

Before the undersigned registrar published today the known personage the midwife Auguste Brietkreutz née Breitkreutz resident of Stieglitz ____ religion, appeared and indicated that the Mietseinwohnerin [house-mate] Emilie Winkelmann née Marquardt, a widow for three years, evangelical religion, resident in the home of the kolonist [tenant farmer] Ferdinand Marquardt of Caroline [Posen, Prussia], gave birth in her residence on the 14th of August in the year one thousand eight hundred seventy eight at 9:00 pm to a male child who was given the name Otto Paul [Winkelmann].

The undersigned midwife Ms. Breitkreutz indicated that she was present with Emilie Winkelmann née Marquardt at this birth.  Signed by Auguste Breitkreutz

So Emilie Marquardt Winkelmann gave birth to a son.  Her husband [a Winkelmann] had died three years earlier.  No mention of the father.  She seems to have been living in the home of a relative, Ferdinand Marquardt, at the time of the birth, but is described as a “house-mate”.  My friend and collaborator Jörg has informed me that the words used in the document “Mietsbewohnerin” and “Einliegerin”, mean that she was a renter with essentially what we call a “mother-in-law suite”.  That is, an apartment within the house that has a separate entrance, allowing Emilie a degree of autonomy from Ferdinand’s household.

Later, I was sent this document by Marlena:

Otto Paul Winkelmann Death, 1879

Otto Paul Winkelmann Death, 1879

Translation:

No. 88

Runau, the 2nd September 1879

Before the undersigned registrar published today the known personage the kolonist Ferdinand Marquardt, resident of Carolina [Posen, Prussia] indicated that Otto Winkelmann, age 1 year 17 days, evengelical religion, resident of Carolina, born in Carolina on the 14th of August 1878, son of the Mitbewohner [co-habitant or housemate] Emilie Winkelmann née Marquardt of Carolina, died in the home of his mother at 11:00 pm on the 1st of September in the year one thousand eight hundred seventy nine.

Attested to by Ferdinand Marquardt who, being illiterate, has made his mark below.

XXX

Then a handwritten note in the margin:

Note of correction
According to the subsequent declaration of the mother of the deceased, Emilie Winkelmann née Marquardt, concerning the hearing from March 10th 1881
the reporting person (his mother) had had information on the death of Otto Paul Winkelmann.  This correction made due to disorder of the royal “Landprüfer” in Schneidemühl, May 9th 1881
Runau, May 16th 1881
the registrar.

So there are a couple mysteries here.  The first is obviously: who was Emilie’s husband and how was he related to the rest of my Winkelmann family that was living in Caroline?  Secondly, how was Ferdinand Marquardt related to Emilie?  One would suspect he was her relative, but she is not referred to as such, but rather as a “house-mate”.

Then my cousin Doris sent me the following record she found on the Poznan Project website:

Marriage record for the protestant community in Schönlanke [Trzcianka].
Entry #4-LNS in 1867

Wilhelm Winkelmann (age 27) father: Ludwig

Emilie Marquard (age 27) father: Johann

Based on several pieces of circumstantial evidence, I believe that Emilie’s father-in-law Ludwig Winkelmann was the brother of my 4x great grandfather Christian Winkelmann, and so Emilie’s deceased husband Wilhelm Winkelmann would have been the first cousin of my 3x great-grandmother Wilhlemine Winkelmann.

So Emilie had married Wilhelm Winkelmann in 1867 in Schönlanke, and he had died in 1875, three years before the birth of Otto Paul Winkelmann.  Emily was living with a family member, Ferdinand Marquardt, who was not her father [perhaps a brother?].  He describes her as a “house mate”.  No name of a father was given, and Emilie was unmarried at the time of the birth.