Category Archives: Mullins

The Mullins and Hammond Families

My great-grandmother Edith Edna Curtis was born 31 Mar 1903 in Dubuque, Iowa and died 26 Mar 1989 in Wausau, Wisconsin.  She was the mother of my maternal grandfather, Lloyd O. Krueger, and the daughter of Florin Herbert “Bert” Curtis and Edna Edith Mullins.

 

Edith Edna Curtis in 1947

I’ll write about the Curtis family some other time because it’s the only family on my mother’s side that’s not made up of recent immigrants to the US.  In fact, some branches of the Curtis family go back to the Pilgrims like much of my father’s family does.  Everyone in the family considered Edith to be “an Irish gal”, even though she was really only half Irish. Edith’s mother, Edna E. Mullins (1881-1964) was the child of Irish immigrants, John Mullins and Mary Jane Hammond.

John Mullins was a blacksmith, said to have been born on 25 Mar 1844 in Ireland, and mostly likely coming to the US about 1862 around the age of 18.  So far nothing is known about his family or his history in Ireland, and it is often the case that Irish immigrants did not know their actual birth dates and picked one once they arrived in America that they used here.

On 14 Sept 1863 John Mullins enlisted as a private in Company E of the 14th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment in the Union Army.  I find this remarkable, because it’s not likely he had been in this country more than a handful of years.  He served nevertheless.

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John Mullins US Army enlistment, 1863

John’s company was sent on detached service to Fort LaFayette in New York Harbor where they manned the heavy cannons protecting the harbor.

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Ft. LaFayette, New York Harbor, 1863

Later, in March 1864 his company joined the Army of the Potomac on the front lines where it was assigned to the 5th corps, to which it was attached throughout the remainder of the war, most of the time assigned to Ayres’ (2nd) division.  According to the New York State Military Museum, “The regiment took part in the engagements of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, the North Anna, Totopotomoy, Cold Harbor, White Oak Swamp, the first assault on Petersburg, Weldon railroad, Poplar Grove Church, Hicksford raid, Hatcher’s run, and the Appomattox campaign, including actions at Five Forks, the fall of Petersburg, and Appomattox Court House. ”

John Mullins was promoted “by special orders” to the rank of Corporal on 16 Aug 1864, and mustered out after the war in Washington D.C. on 26 Aug 1865.  I don’t know when his regiment returned from Virginia to Washington D.C., so I don’t know if he was in the nation’s capitol when President Lincoln was assassinated in April 1865.

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John Mullins (1844-1894)

Faded service stone near the grave of John Mullins: “John Mullins, Co. E 14th Reg. N.Y. Heavy Art.”

Edna Mullins’ mother was the afore-mentioned Martha J. Hammond.  You can learn a lot more about her in this story.  She was born on on 22 Jun 1848 in Drummenny, Donegal, Ireland, the third child of John Hammond and Jane Bustard.  Martha came from a rather extensive family, having seven full siblings and thirteen half-siblings.  She arrived in the US on 26 Sept 1866 aboard the “Caledonia” sailing from Glasgow, Scotland to New York City.  She was 17 years old and traveling with her 20-year-old sister Elizabeth “Betty” Hammond.

The Caledonia which brought the Hammond sisters to the US in 1866.

Martha is in the 1870 census for Marengo, Iowa living with her 11-year-old sister Margaret.  John is in the same Census working as a Blacksmith on the ranch of cattle dealer Thomas Crew.  The next year, on 18 May 1871, the two were married in Marengo.

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John Mullins & Mary Jane Hammond, c1871.

Four children were born in Marengo, and my 2x-great-grandmother Edna Mullins was born after the family moved to Grinnell, Iowa about 1879.  The family can be found in the 1880 census for Grinnell.   John is again listed as a blacksmith.

John Mullins was only 49 years old when he died in Grinnell of “paralysis” on 29 Jun 1894.  He was buried in Hazelwood Cemetery.  Martha went to live with her daughter Bessie and her husband Guy H. Curtis where they can be found in the 1900, 1910, 1915, 1920, and 1930 census records.  Martha Hammond Mullins died in Grinnell of heart disease on 2 Dec 1930 at the age of 82.

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Martha Jane Hammond c1920

Their daughter (my 2x-great-grandmother) Edna Mullins was born in Grinnell, Iowa on 30 July 1881.  She married Florin Herbert “Bert” Curtis on 31 Dec 1896 in Great Falls, Montana.  She lied about her age and said she was 16 on her marriage license, but really she was only 15 years old.  Bert was 21.

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Curtis family, about 1900.

After a brief stint in Montana, they moved back to Iowa.  Bert and Edna had at least nine children, and likely ten, between 1898 and 1917.  Edna was a housewife, raising the kids, and Bert worked painting carriages.  Eventually they moved to Toledo, Iowa and Bert made the move from painting carriages to painting cars.  By 1946 Bert and Edna had moved to Dubuque.

Burt & Edna Curtis in 1944

Bert Curtis and Edna Mullins at their 50th wedding anniversary celebration. January 1, 1947.

Bert died of a heart attack on 4 Oct 1952 at the age of 77, and Edna died 27 May 1964 at University Hospital of gangrene (probably diabetes-related).  She was 82.  They are both buried in Linwood Cemetery in Dubuque.

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Portraits of Martha Jane Hammond (1848-1930) & John Mullins (1844-1894)

Martha Jane Hammond was my 3x great-grandmother.  She was born in Drummenny, Donegal, Ireland, the daughter of John Hammond and Jane Bustard.  She married John Mullins, a fellow Irish immigrant and US Civil War veteran in Marengo, Iowa in 1871.

The descendants of my great-grand-aunt Ruth Curtis in Dubuque, Iowa have a large repository of family history documents and photos.  In that collection was the following portrait, which was marked in a conflicting manner as both “Martha Jane Hammond” and also as her daughter “Agnes Mullins”.

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Martha Jane Hammond c1871

 

The front says “Aggie (Agnes) Mullins”.  The back says “Grandma Martha Mullins – Ruthie’s (Ruth Curtis’s) Grandmother”.

Agnes Mullins died at age 15, so when I first saw this portrait I felt like it could not have been her.  I proceeded for a long time with the assumption that this was a portrait of Martha Jane Hammond as a young woman.  You can see that there’s another person seated next to her, so this was cropped from a larger portrait of two people.  That usually means a marriage photo, so it was probably taken about the time of her wedding in 1871.  I’m guessing the “Aggie Mullins” might mean it originally belonged to her, and then passed to another family member (presumably my 2x-great-grandmother Edna Mullins) when Agnes died in 1891.

Then many months later a cousin named Michael Curtis uploaded several new photos to his account on Ancestry.com.  They are not scanned very well, but they are clear enough that one can get a much better picture of Martha and her husband John Mullins.

The first photo was of Martha’s husband (my 3x great-grandfather) John Mullins.  It’s not clear when it was taken, but he looks to be about 35 years old, so I’m guessing it was taken about 1880.  The photo was taken in Grinnell, Iowa, which was where the family was living in 1880.

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John Mullins (1844-1894)

When he enlisted in the 14th New York Heavy Artillery regiment in 1863, he was 19 years old and described as 5’6″ in height with blue eyes, light hair, and fair complexion.

The next photo is of Martha with one of her daughters:

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Martha Jane Hammond and unknown daughter, courtesy of Michael Curtis.

To me, it didn’t seem like the same woman as the older photo I already had.  The jaw-line is similarly strong, and the hair is curly in both, but this woman seemed to have pale blue eyes, and in the older photo the woman seemed to have darker eyes.  Then another photo of Martha as an older woman was put online:

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Martha Jane Hammond as an older woman.  Courtesy of Michael Curtis.

This looked to be the same woman as the middle portrait.

Next came one of the missing pieces of the puzzle.  It’s the full portrait from which the original portrait of Martha was taken:

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John Mullins & Martha Jane Hammond, c1871.  Courtesy of Michael Curtis.

My first thought was this must be two of the children of John and Martha.  I remembered that the original portrait had been labeled “Agnes Mullins”, so I thought it was Agnes and her older brother, William Mullins.  But as I said, Agnes died at age 15, and the ages of these two didn’t seem correct for her to be 14 or 15 and him to be 20.  It seemed more likely that this was a wedding portrait of John and Martha.

The final piece of the puzzle was this portrait of Guy Harvey Curtis (brother of my 2x-great-grandfather Florin Herbert Curtis) and his wife Winifred Elizabeth “Bessie” Mullins, who was the daughter of John and Martha.  It was obviously taken in their living room and two portraits are visible:

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Bessie Mullins & Guy H. Curtis, courtesy of Michael Curtis

The obvious thing is the same portrait of Martha Jane Hammond on the wall.  Less obvious is that the full version of the portrait (with John Mullins) is barely visible behind the chair of Guy H. Curtis.  One can recognize the same hat and face, etc, from the wedding portrait.

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JohnMullins&MarthaHammond_detail

To me it makes sense that Bessie would have portraits of her parents in her home, so it cemented my view that the original portrait must be Martha Jane Hammond taken about the time of her wedding to John Mullins c1871.


The Hammond Family of Donegal, Ireland

My 3x great-grandmother Martha Jane Hammond was born just outside the city of Donegal in County Donegal, Ireland.  This updated document will outline new information about her family that has been obtained from Irish civil and church records, and other sources.

Alexander Hammond and Margaret Lenox

Alexander Hammond and his wife Margaret Lenox, my 6x great-grandparents were likely born near Donegal in the late 1760’s.  They were married in Drumhome, Donegal, Ireland on 20 Jul 1792.  Alexander’s father was listed as Andrew Hammond, and Margaret’s father was listed as Daniel Lenox.  Andrew was from Ballydermot and his wife from Tullyleague, according to their marriage record.

Alexander and Margaret had the following children, all born in Drumhome, Donegal Ireland:

  1. Andrew Hammond (bap 1 May 1792 in Ballydermot).
  2. Alexander Hammond (bap 20 Aug 1794 in Lismintin).
  3. Andrew Hammond II (bap 9 Mar 1796 in Lismintan), married Elizabeth Graham, died 24 Feb 1871 in Agadowey, Drumholm, Donegal, Ireland at the age of 74.
  4. Richard Hammond (bap 5 Oct 1798 in Ballydermot).
  5. Robert Hammond (bap 5 Oct 1798 in Ballydermot).
  6. Timothy Hammond (bap 12 Dec 1802 in Ballydermot).

Francis Graham and Jane Pearson

Francis Graham and his wife Jane Pearson (also my 6x great grandparents) were married about 1790 in Drumhome, Donegal, Ireland.  Francis had been married before to Jane Griffith, with whom he had a daughter Mary Graham, born in 1783.

Francis Graham and Jane Pearson had the following children, all born in Dromore, Drumhome, Donegal Ireland:

  1. Elizabeth Graham I (bap 17 Jul 1791).
  2. Hannah Graham (bap 19 Oct 1792).
  3. Elizabeth Graham II (bap 12 Dec 1793).

Andrew Hammond and Elizabeth Graham

Andrew Hammond II and Elizabeth Graham were my 5x great-grandparents.  Andrew Hammond II was born in Mar, 1796 in Ballydermot, Drumhome, Donegal, Ireland and baptized there on 1 May 1792.  He married Elizabeth Graham, daughter of Francis Graham and his wife Jane Pearson on 20 Sept 1814 in Donegal Parish of Donegal County.  Elizabeth was listed as being from Drumholm and Andrew from Donegal.

Andrew and Elizabeth had six known children who were born in the parish of Finnabanes in County Donegal except Andrew who seems to have been born while visiting Elizabeth’s family in Drumholm:

  1. John Hammond (born 15 Jun 1816), married Jane Bustard and Margaret Miller, died 15 Mar 1895 in Glencoagh, Mountcharles, Donegal, Ireland at the age of 78.
  2. Edward Hammond (b 26 Oct 1818).
  3. Jane Hammond (b 18 Mar 1822, married George Hanna, died 4 Dec 1891 in Ballintra, Donegal, Ireland).
  4. Mary Ann Hammond (b 23 Aug 1826).
  5. Andrew Hammond (b 24 Apr 1828 in parish Dromore, married Margaret Bustard, died 7 Jun 1903 in Finnabanes).
  6. William Hammond (b 7 Jul 1829, married Martha Jane Kealty, died abt 1880 in Brooklyn, Iowa).

John and Ann Bustard

John and Ann Bustard were my 5x great-grandparents.  They were married about 1819 in County Donegal, Ireland (likely in Clarcam).  They had the following children in Clarcam, Donegal, Ireland:

  1. William Bustard (b 6 Apr 1820).
  2. Jane Bustard (b 27 Jul 1823).
  3. Isabella Bustard (b 11 Nov 1825).
  4. John Bustard (bap 11 Nov 1832).

John Hammond and Jane Bustard

John Hammond and Jane Bustard were my 4x great-grandparents.  John Hammond was born 15 Jun 1816 in Finnabanes, and was baptized 16 Jun 1816 in the same place.  Jane Bustard was born 27 Jul 1823 in Clarcam, Donegal, Ireland and was baptized there on 29 Jul 1823.  They were married on 29 Dec 1841 in Donegal.  John’s brother William was listed as one of the witnesses. The children of John Hammond and Jane Bustard were all born in County Donegal, Ireland:

1) Anna “Ann” Hammond was born 1 Nov 1843 in Finnabanes.  She married Richard King on 17 Aug 1871 in Grinnell, Iowa, and they had at least four children.  Ann died 26 Oct 1925 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

2) Elizabeth “Betty” Hammond was born 5 Nov 1845 in Drummenny and died 5 Oct 1932, likely in Cheyenne, Wyoming where she had been working as a housekeeper.  She is not believed to have married or had any children.

3) Martha Jane Hammond was born 22 Jun 1848 in Drummenny.  She married John Mullins on 18 May 1871 in Marengo, Iowa.  They had five children.  Martha died 2 Dec 1930 in Grinnell, Iowa due to heart disease.

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Martha Jane Hammond and unknown daughter, courtesy of Michael Curtis.

4) Mary Hammond was born 18 Mar 1851 in Finnabanes.  She married Albert Hickman on 15 Apr 1879 in Iowa County, Iowa.  They had two children.  She died 8 Sept 1914 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

5) Andrew J Hammond was born 1 Dec 1853 in Finnabanes.  He married Mary Magdelein Pilgrim on 16 Sept 1878 at Union, Iowa.  They had three daughters.  He died 30 Sept 1903 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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Andrew Hammond and family.

6) Margaret Hammond I was born 24 Jun 1856 in Finnabanes.  She likely died at or shortly after birth.

7) Margaret “Maggie” Hammond II was born 10 Oct 1858 in Finnabanes.  She married James B. Johnson about 1879.  They had a daughter Lorenia M “Lola” Johnson (1880-1954) .  Maggie then married Adam Dunlap in 1897 in Grinnell, Iowa.  They had a son, Leroy Daniel “Roy” Dunlap (1900-1963).  Maggie died 10 Nov 1931 in Harvey, Illinois.

8) Catherine “Kate” Hammond was born about 1862, likely in Finnabanes.  So far her birth record has not been located.  She married Dock D Harr on 6 Jun 1882 in Hampton, Iowa, and they had at least one daughter, Cecile I Harr (1833-1958).  Kate died 26 Jul 1934 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

On 26 Dec 1864, John married his second wife, Margaret Miller, daughter of Robert Miller, who was 27 years younger than him (he was 48, she was 21).  They had thirteen more children in County Donegal:

  1. William John Hammond (b 30 Nov 1865 in Lacrum).
  2. Robert Hammond (b 15 Jan 1867 in Lacrum).
  3. Matthew Hammmond (b 4 May 1868 in Lacrum).
  4. George Hammond (b 28 Jul in Lacrum).
  5. Fannie Hammond (b 20 Nov 1870 in Lacrum).
  6. Elizabeth Isabella Hammond (b 21 Jun 1872 in Lacrum).
  7. Francis Hammond (b 14 Oct 1873 in Altilow).
  8. Edward John Hammond (b 25 Apr 1875 in Altilow).
  9. Martha Hammond (b 25 Nov 1877 in Altilow).
  10. Alexander Hammond (b 20 Jun 1879 in Altilow).
  11. Ella J Hammond (b 28 May 1881 in Altilow, baptized as Rebecca).
  12. Matthew John Hammond (b 28 Nov 1883 in Altilow, baptized as John).
  13. Rebecca Hammond (b 27 Feb 1887 in Altilow).

John died 15 Mar 1891 in Glencoagh Mountcharles, Donegal, Ireland.  His occupation was listed as “weaver”.  His second wife Margaret Miller died in West Fork, Iowa on 4 Mar 1909.

John Mullins and Martha Jane Hammond

John Mullins and Martha Jane Hammond were my 3x great-grandparents.

John was born in Ireland (perhaps in Dublin) on 25 Mar 1844 (per his gravestone), and came to America before the Civil War.  He worked as a blacksmith in Buffalo, Erie, New York, and enlisted in the Union Army there in August 1863 as part of Company E of the 14th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment.  He was described as having blue eyes, light hair, fair compexion and as being 5’6″ in height.

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John Mullins (1844-1894)

John was mustered out of the Union Army on 26 Aug 1865 in Washington D.C. and went to work in Marengo, Iowa as a blacksmith.  He is in the 1870 Census there working as one of four blacksmiths on the ranch of Thomas Crew, a stock (cattle) dealer.

He married Martha Jane Hammond on 18 May 1871 in Marengo, and they had the following children:

  1. William Richard Mullins (b 27 May 1872 in Marengo).
  2. Jessiman May “Jessie” Mullins (b 8 Feb 1874 in Marengo).
  3. Agnes Mullins (b 2 Jul 1876 in Marengo).
  4. Elizabeth Winifred “Bessie” Mullins (b 28 Apr 1878 in Marengo).
  5. Edith Edna Mullins (b 30 Jul 1881 in Grinnell).

John Mullins died of paralysis on 31 Jan 1894 in Grinnell, Iowa.  His wife Martha Jane Hammond died of heart disease on 2 Dec 1930, also in Grinnell.


Ancestry.com DNA Testing

For Christmas this year, I decided that I wanted to get my mother and father DNA-tested through Ancestry.com.  While it’s true that my family tree is extremely well-elucidated and researched, there are still pockets where certain things are unclear.  For example, I only know back to my 3x great-grandparents on my Krueger side (due to records from Pomerania being difficult to find and the common nature of the family name), so if we matched someone in the world who had Krueger ancestors it would indicate a link between those families despite the absence of documentation.  Similar situations are present for many of the Irish lines of my family due to the scarcity of records from Ireland.

So at Christmas this year my mother spit into a test-tube and sent off an envelope to be analyzed.   Yesterday we got the results back.

My mother’s DNA matched at least 20 people “closely” (5th cousins or better).  I’ll have to investigate each one!

It showed that she has 19% DNA from Scandanavia (that would be the Norwegian side, Hanson and Olson), 32% “Europe East”, which would be the Prussian stuff (Krueger, Hoge, Schmidt, Zierke, Schulz, Winkelmann).  Then 38% from “Great Britain”.  I assume this is the Irish from the Mullins, Hammond, and all the British stuff from the Curtis side of my family.  Then there’s 9% of the DNA marked “Other”.

I have no idea how much confidence to give these results.  I know from my research that my mother’s grandparents break down as follows:

Oscar Krueger: 100% Prussian
Edith Curtis: 50% Irish and 50% English
Olga Hanson: 100% Norwegian
Edwin Schmidt: 100% Prussian

So my maternal grandfather was 50% Prussian, 25% Irish, 25% English, and my maternal grandmother was 50% Norwegian and 50% Prussian.  That makes my mother 50% Prussian, 25% Irish/English, and 25% Norwegian.  The DNA results have much more “Great Britain” than predicted.  No idea what that means.

On the Schmidt side of my mother’s family there was a family rumor that someone in the family brought back and married a “Mongolian Princess”.  Interestingly, my mother’s DNA shows 2% of her genetics are from “Asia Central” which is the area around Turkmenistan and Northern Iran.  Very interesting!

Here’s the full breakdown of her results:

Great Britain 38%
Europe East 32%
Scandinavia 19%
Ireland 4%
Europe West 4%
Asia Central 2%
Finland/Northwest Russia 1%

As time goes on and other people are tested, we can see if more matches are found.


Mother’s Day – 2013

For Mother’s Day this year I decided to pay tribute to all the mothers in my Family Tree who contributed to making me who I am.  Of course there are tens or hundreds of thousands of women in my direct line of ancestry, if you go back to the beginning of our species.  My family tree goes back to the 1500’s in some places, to my 11x or 12x great grandparents.  As I’ve said before, that’s about 20,000 grandparents in your entire family tree to that depth.  Obviously there’s no way I can pay meaningful tribute to 10,000 women, so I decided to put together a collection of all the mothers, grandmothers, and great-grandmothers that I have photos of in my tree.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

 

Happy Mother’s Day, my beloved ancestors!

The women who made me who I am.

The women who made me who I am.