Category Archives: Bacon

Church Street, Burlington Vermont – 1880 & 1930

I tend to grab photos from eBay auctions that relate in some way to my family.  The Bacons (my great-grandmother was Delia Bacon) lived and worked on or near Church Street in Burlington, and apparently at some point I grabbed a couple photos of that street.  I happened to discover them this morning and I liked the contrast between the two photos very much.  If you look carefully you can see that several of the buildings are the different, but most are the same.  It’s fun to play “what’s the same, and what has changed?”.

[Click on photos to enlarge or download.]

Church Street, Burlington, 1880's

Church Street, Burlington, 1880’s

Church Street, Burlington, 1930's

Church Street, Burlington, 1930’s

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Olivier Family Photos – Part II

My cousin Micheline has spent decades working on her family genealogy.  She was kind enough to share her extensive collection of Olivier family photos with me, and she gave me permission to make them available where other members of the family could find them.  To be honest, it’s difficult for me to narrow down the more than 12 dozen photos she has sent me so far, because they are all excellent.  But I’ll do my best.  My plan is to post the main family line here, and then have separate blogs with photos from each sibling.

I am related to the Olivier family through Delia Bacon, the mother of my paternal grandfather.  Delia’s mother was Cordelia Olivier.  Micheline and I are both descendants of Cordelia’s father Henri François Olivier (1812-1876).

Micheline’s family comes from Cordelia’s brother Henri Octave Olivier (1836-1911).  Octave was born 18 Feb 1836 and baptized at La Visitation-de-l’Île-Dupas in Québec.  For most of his life he lived in Ste-Elizabeth and St-Thomas, Québec (near Montréal), but he and his family can also be found in the 1880 census for Holyoke, Massachusetts where they lived briefly, and where Octave is listed as a “Laborer”.  He died on 13 May 1911 and was buried in St-Thomas.

Henri Octave Olivier

Henri Octave Olivier

I’ve already posted a photo I purchased from eBay of Philomène Cottenoire, who was Henri’s wife.  This is a photo of Philomène as an older lady, probably taken about 1919:

Philomène Cottenoire c1919.

Philomène Cottenoire c1919.

Henri and Philomène had 13 children… seven boys and six girls.  Five of them died in infancy or early childhood.  Of the eight surviving children, I have photos of seven of them.  So far I do not have a photo of their eldest son, Joseph Philémon “Philémon” Olivier (1860-1918), who married Marie Celeste LaPorte.

The next son was Louis Dolor “Adélard” Olivier (1861-1921).  The only photo I have of him is from his funeral flyer, and it’s not very clear.  Adélard married Marie Philomène Georgianna Olivier, who was his second cousin.

Adélard Olivier

Adélard Olivier

The next surviving child was their son Joseph Hildaige “Hildaige” Olivier (1865-1952).  I posted a photo of his family in a previous blog, but here is a close-up of him and his wife, Lucie Brasseur from that photo.

Lucie & Hildaige, 1904

Lucie & Hildaige, 1904

The next child was Cordélie Catherine Olivier (1867-1907) who married Charles Perreault and lived in Burlington, Vermont.  I only have one photo of them which I’d posted previously, but here it is again:

Charles Perreault and Cordélia Olivier, 1890.

Charles Perreault and Cordélia Olivier, 1890.

Next came Marie Josephine Albina “Albina” Olivier (1869-1928), who married Joseph Charles Desroches.  I’ve already posted their wedding photo, and a photo of them with their two daughters, so here is one of Albina as a young woman that Micheline sent me.

Albina Olivier c1890

Albina Olivier c1890

The next child was Henri Octave Eugène “Eugène” Olivier (1874-1965), who married Marie Angélina Masse.  I already posted their wedding photo, so here is a photo of Eugène taken from his funeral flyer.

Eugène Olivier

Eugène Olivier

Since that’s a little grim, here’s another.  This photo shows Eugène [top row, center] with his brother-in-law Anthime Moreau [top, row left], his wife Angélina [bottom row left], his sister Albina [bottom row, center], his and his nieces Yvonne Desroches [top row, right], and Blandine Desroches [bottom row, right].

Eugène Olivier with family, 1917

Eugène Olivier with family, 1917

Next came Marie Victoria “Victoria” Olivier (1876-1945), who married the aforementioned Anthime Moreau.  Here is a lovely photo of Victoria with her family taken about 1916.

Anthime Moreau Family, 1916

Anthime Moreau Family, 1916

Back row: Joseph Jean Baptiste, Marie Blanche Délia, Marie Angélina, Marie Aurore Pamela, and Joseph Octave Philibert.  Middle row: Anthime Duplessie, Marie Elisa Herminie, Victoria Olivier, and Marie Exilda Aldéa.  Front row: Joseph Ovila Adélard, Joseph Ulric Donat, and Marie-Jeanne.

They had another son, Joseph Rolland Sylvio, who was born in 1920 after this photo was taken.

The last surviving child was Marie Evelina “Evelina” Olivier (1878-1934), who married Jean Baptiste Guillaume “William” Morrisseau.  Here is a lovely photo from their wedding on 19 Sept 1898 in Burlington, Vermont.

Mélina Oliver & William Morrisseau, 1898

Evelina Oliver & William Morrisseau, 1898

In 1906 Henri Octave Olivier and Philomène Cottenoire celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary two years early.  Here is an article from that celebration with a translation in English:

48th Wedding Anniversary Article

48th Wedding Anniversary Article

A beautiful family celebration took place last Saturday. The “Day of the Kings” at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Octave Olivier of Saint-Thomas de Joliette [Québec, Canada], on the occasion of the 48th anniversary of their marriage. One of the spouses is 69 years old and the other 67. All the children were present: Philémon from Providence, United States; Adélard and Hildège of Burlington; Eugène of Saint-Thomas de Joliette, Cordélia, wife of Mr. Ch[arle]s. Perreault of Burlington; Victoria, wife of Anthime Moreau of Berthier; Albina, Mrs. Ch[arle]s. Desroches of Joliette, and Mélina [Evelina], Mrs. C. Mousseau [Morrisseau] of Burlington. All the sons are married and of these different marriages were born 32 grandchildren, among which is a great-grand-child Blanche Baillargeon, age 2, daughter of Félix Baillargeon who is the husband of Hildège Olivier’s daughter from Burlington, VT. It was a joyful reunion because the family of Mr. Octave Olivier hasn’t gotten together in 21 years. In light of the poor health of Mr. Octave Olivier, the date of their golden wedding anniversary celebration was moved up by two years.


Jean Gregoire Bacon (1850-1936)

Jean Gregoire Bacon, my great-great-grandfather, was born 19 Dec 1850 in the town of Joliette, Québec, Canada.  He was baptized the next day at Ste-Elizabeth.  In French the record says:

“The 20th December, 1850, I the undersigned priest have baptized Gregoire born yesterday of the legitimate marriage of Jean Bacon, farmer, and of Marie Anne Gilbert of this parish.  Godfather: Jean Baptiste Robillard, Godmother: Marguérite Champagne, who, with the father, did not know how to sign [their names].”

Jean G. Bacon, Baptism, 1850

Jean G. Bacon, Baptism, 1850

Jean G. Bacon was born into a catholic, French-speaking, farming family, the son of Jean Baptiste Bacon Sr (1804-1889) and Marie Anne “Marianne” Gilbert dite Comtois (1812-1867).  He had three sisters and six brothers, as well as four half siblings from his father’s two previous marriages.  [Interestingly, Jean had a half-brother named Jean-Baptiste Bacon Jr (1824-1864) who was in Company K of the 1st Cavalry Regiment from Vermont during the Civil War.  He died on 8 Dec 1864 at Richmond, Virginia while a prisoner of war, only three months after he joined the Union Army.]

Jean’s was not an uncommonly large family for rural Québec at that time.   In other branches of Jean’s family tree we often find ten, twelve, fourteen, or even more children.  These were farming families.  They had lots of kids, many of whom would not survive childhood.  It was not uncommon for the women to die and for the men to remarry and continue having children with a second or third wife.  And they were almost always illiterate.  The French Canadian records between 1640 and 1860 are almost always terminated with the phrase seen above: “The participants did not know how to sign their names”.

Jean’s family had been in Québec, also called “New France” (Nouvelle France), since 1645 when his 4x great-grandfather Gilles Bacon came to Québec from St-Gilles in Normandy, France as a Jesuit Missionary.

Jean and his family are in the 1851 census for Joliette, Québec where his father is listed as a “Cultivateur” or farmer.  Some of the sons are listed as “Journalier” or day-laborer.  Jean is listed as “Gregoire” and is one year old.

Bacon Family Census, 1851

Bacon Family Census, 1851

He and his family are listed again in the 1861 census for Ste-Elizabeth, Berthier County, Québec when Jean was 11 years old.

Our first record of Jean in America comes in the 1870 census when he was 20 years old.  There are no entries for him before this in the Burlington City Directory, so it’s fairly likely that this was about the time he came to America.  Jean is listed as “John Bacon” in the census for Burlington, Vermont, where he is living with George Chase, a railroad engineer, and working as a “wheelwright” – a crafter of wooden wheels for wagons or carriages.  He is listed as being able to read and write.

1870 Burlington Census

1870 Burlington Census

In 1871, he briefly went to work for C.B. Gray, a carriage and sleigh manufacturer who had his workshop at 183 S. Champlain Street in Burlington.  This photo of the building was likely taken right around that time:

C. B. Gray Carriage Company c1870

C. B. Gray Carriage Company c1870

[Photo from “Burlington: Volume II” by Mary Ann DiSpirito]

183 S. Champlain Street

183 S. Champlain Street – Present Day

That same year he seems to have gone back home to Québec to get married.  On 27 Aug 1871 “Gregoire Bacon of Burlington” and “Cordélie Olivier of [Ste-Elizabeth]” signed as godparents of Cordelia’s niece Marie Emma Olivier.  Oddly, Emma was also Jean’s niece since Emma’s mother was Valérie Bacon, Jean’s sister!

About a week later, Jean married Cordélie (Cordelia) Olivier on 4 Sept 1871 at Ste-Elizabeth in Joliette.  Unlike the many generations which preceded them, both Jean Gregoire and Cordelia signed their marriage record, as did many of the witnesses present.

Bacon Olivier Marriage Signatures, 1871

Bacon Olivier Marriage Signatures, 1871

Cordélia Olivier was born only three months before her husband on 11 Sept 1850 in the same town of Ste-Elizabeth, Joliette, Québec, Canada.  The daughter of Henri François Olivier (1812-1876) and Elizabeth Tellier (1815-1886), Cordélia was the thirteenth of sixteen children in the family of nine girls and seven boys.  In fact, between 1836 and 1855 the Oliviers only missed having children in four of those 20 years!  Just as impressive, only one of those children died in infancy, so Cordélia must have grown up in a very crowded house.

In 1872, Jean and his new wife moved back to Burlington to stay.  He applied to be a US Citizen and was naturalized on 31 Aug 1872.

Naturalization, 1872

Naturalization, 1872

From 1875-1880 Jean worked as a wheelwright for Harmon A. Ray, who was a wagon-maker who had a shop at the corner of Front and North Streets in Burlington and from 1880-1885 he worked for the William Smith Carriage Company.

H. A. Ray Carriage Shop on Front Street, present day.

H. A. Ray Carriage Shop on Front Street, present day.

William Smith Advertisement, 1890

William Smith Advertisement, 1890

These were no crude wagons that Jean was helping to build; they were the equivalent of Cadillacs.  These carriages were made of elegant polished woods with luxurious upholstery and finishes.  Jean was a craftsman, helping to build the finest conveyances of his era:

“The open and top buggies on display were of superior craftsmanship and were sold for close to a thousand dollars. These ranged from yacht bodied, coal-box patterned open buggies to Germantown Rockaway’s. It is said that a Mr. Henry Loomis purchased an elegantly cushioned and upholstered Germantown Rockaway for 800 dollars. With this being known, it is understood that more than just carpentry and finishing went into this craft, but upholstery as well.”

[From: http://www.uvm.edu/~hp206/2013/pages/pellegrino/index.html#gray].

Around this time four children were born to Jean and his wife Cordelia:  Alexander Moses Bacon (11 Aug 1875 – 24 Sept 1947), Olive Ava “Eva” Bacon (1 Nov 1878 – 11 Dec 1938), a stillborn boy born on 15 Oct 1881, and their last child, my great-grandmother Delia Rosanna Bacon (17 Oct 1885 – 20 Oct 1918).  There was another child who died in infancy whose records I have not yet found.  [Cordelia is listed as the mother of 5 children, 3 living in the 1900 Census.]

Alex, Olive, and Delia Bacon (l to r).

Alex, Olive, and Delia Bacon (l to r).

1880 Burlington Census

1880 Burlington Census

This next photo shows the Joseph Cartier blacksmith and carriage shop in Burlington about 1885.  It gives you an idea of the kind of places Jean was working during this period.  (Jean went to work for Joseph some years later.)

Carriage Company, 1886

Cartier Carriage Company, 1886

[Photo courtesy of John Fisher: http://www.johnfishersr.net/cartier.html]

In 1881, Jean purchased a property at 45 Archibald Street that would be in his family for many years to come.  In fact, his son Alexander lived there from 1902 until his death in 1947.

45ArchibaldStreetBurlingtonVT

45 Archibald Street, present day.

My great-great-grandfather briefly opened a wheelwright shop in the Summer of 1886 as part of the Patnaude blacksmith shop, according to this article in the local paper:

June 30, 1886

June 30, 1886 “Argus and Patriot”

That same year he was also listed in the City Directory as working for carriage-maker Jerry Lee at 175 Pearl Street.

He must have yearned to go into business for himself, because in 1888 he temporarily retired from the Carriage-making business to open a grocery store, first at 148 N. Champlain Street – where he and his family lived above his store…

148 N. Champlain Street.

148 N. Champlain Street.

then from 1890 to 1901 at the location of the new Bacon family home: 24 Cedar Street.

Bacon Home on Cedar Street from 1890 Burlington City Map

Bacon Home on Cedar Street from 1890 Burlington City Map

Jean and his family would live at 24 Cedar Street for the next 66 years, but for those eleven years he also ran a business selling “groceries and provisions” out of the building.

24 Cedar Street.

24 Cedar Street, residence of the Bacon family for more than 65 years.

1900 Burlington Census

1900 Burlington Census

From 1902-1905 Jean doesn’t have an occupation listed in the city directory, so he may have been “between jobs” for that period.

BaconFamily

The Bacon Family c1905. Olive, Delia, & Alex (back row). Jean and Cordelia seated in front.

He then returned to carriage-making, working for two years (1906-1907) at the Joseph Cartier blacksmith and wagon shop on 128 North Street.

Cartier Blacksmith Shop, 128 North Street c1895

Cartier Blacksmith Shop, 128 North Street c1895

[Photo courtesy of John Fisher: http://www.johnfishersr.net/cartier.html]

In 1907 the family of Charles Perreault and his wife’s niece Cordelia Olivier were living with Jean’s son Alexander Bacon at 45 Archibald Street.  In the 1910 census, however, two of the Perreault children were living with the Bacon family without their parents.  I’ll write more about that story in an upcoming blog.

1910 Burlington Census

1910 Burlington Census

From 1911-1919 he returned to the William Smith Carriage Company as a wheelwright working out of the new Smith shop at 168 St. Paul.  He may, in fact, have had his own shop there since he is listed as “Wheelwright in own shop” in the 1920 census.

164-186 St. Paul Street (uvm.edu photo)

164-168 St. Paul Street (uvm.edu photo)

Unfortunately, 1918 was a year of great tragedy for Jean.  The Spanish Influenza, which would kill between 20 and 50 million people in the US, swept through Burlington.  Jean’s daughter Delia Bacon Thomas died from the illness on 20 Oct 1918, leaving behind her husband Fred Thomas and two young children.  You can read that full story here:

The Story of Delia Bacon & Fred Thomas Sr.

Four days later, on 24 Oct 1918, Jean’s wife Cordelia Olivier also died from the same influenza.  She was buried in Mount Calvary Cemetery in Burlington.

The 1920 Census finds Jean living at 24 Cedar Street alone.  His daughter Olive and her husband Jim Halloran had taken his grandson Fred Thomas Jr, and Anna Thomas, the sister of Fred Thomas Sr., had taken in his grand-daughter Grace Thomas.

1920 Burlington Census

1920 Burlington Census

For the last two years of his working life, 1921 and 1922, Jean worked for the Herberg Service shop at 137 S. Winooski Ave.  He retired in 1923 at the age of 73.   This photo shows the building about 16 years after Jean retired.  It had transitioned completely from building and servicing carriages to servicing automobiles.  The world was changing.

137 S. Winooski Ave, c1939.

137 S. Winooski Ave, c1939.

In the 1930 census he is living at home with his daughter Olive and her husband Jim Halloran.  He is listed as widowed and no occupation is given.

1930 Burlington Census

1930 Burlington Census

In many ways Jean Gregoire Bacon was a remarkable man.  He made the step into a new country, learned English, and built a life for himself by working hard.  He stepped beyond the subsistence farming lifestyle his family had known for hundreds of years to learn a skilled trade.  He learned to read and write when very few if any of his ancestors could.  He endured many tragedies, and took care of, not just his own family, but the children of other families as well.

Jean Bacon died in his home at 24 Cedar Street on 23 Nov 1936 from acute bronchitis.  He was buried with his wife in Mount Calvary Cemetery.

Grave of Jean G. Bacon and Cordelia Olivier.

Grave of Jean G. Bacon and Cordelia Olivier.

Jean G. Bacon - 5 Generation Tree

Jean G. Bacon – 5 Generation Tree


Father’s Day – 2013

As I did on Mother’s Day this year, I put together a collection of photographs of all the fathers in my family tree who contributed to making me the person I am.

Happy Father’s Day, my ancestors!

Fathers_2013


“Les Filles du Roi” – The Daughters of the King

As I wrote about recently, several of my grandmothers were essentially paid by the French monarchy to come to Québec to be brides for the settlers of New France (Nouvelle France).  These women were called the “Filles du Roi”, or daughters of the King.

Their transportation to the New World was paid for by the crown, and they were given a monetary sum plus a dowry of various bridal supplies as an enticement to come to Québec.  Several of the immigrant ancestors in my French lineage were these “Filles du Roi”, so I’m just making a note here of which ones they were.  Note that below, Marquérite Fontaine was not my direct-line ancestor, but one of her husbands, Pierre Ratel, was:

BONVILLE (BONHEUR), Marie   27 Oct 1669            Paul INARD
                            Ste Famille, I.O.      (Carignan soldier)

FONTAINE, Marguerite        bef 1681 census        Jacques GIRARD dit
                            Sorel, PQ              VIMONT
                            22 Aug 1684            Pierre RATEL
                            Repentigny, PQ
                            21 Dec 1691            Maurice OLIVIER

LEMAIRE, Marie              28 Dec 1669            Pierre RATEL
                            Montreal, PQ

MARTIN, Marie               4 Feb 1666             Jean VALLEE
                            Chateau-Richer, PQ
                            5 Dec 1673             Jacques CHARIER dit
                            Ste Famille, I.O.      LAFONTAINE

PELLETIER dit PASSAVANT,    14 Dec 1665            Pierre PAPIN
Anne                        Montreal, PQ

PILLAT, Catherine           19 Oct 1665            Pierre CHARRON
                            Montreal, PQ
                            13 Jan 1709            Sebastien BRISON
                            Montreal, PQ

RENAUD, Marie               25 Oct 1668            Francois LEROUX dit
                            Quebec, PQ             CARDINAL


Immigrant Ancestors for Cordélie Olivier

As I wrote previously, my great-grandmother Delia Rosanna Bacon was almost 100% French.

Delia Bacon and Grace Thomas

Delia Bacon and Grace Thomas

I have finally finished tracing every branch of her family tree back to the original immigrant ancestors (with one possible exception).  For the immigrant ancestors of her father you can visit this link: Immigrant Ancestors for Jean Gregoire Bacon.

These are the immigrant ancestors for her mother, Cordélie Olivier (1850-1918).  Cordélie died in the Spanish Flu Epidemic of 1918 just four days after her daughter Delia did.

Grave of Jean Bacon and Cordelia Olivier

Grave of Jean Bacon and Cordelia Olivier

You will note in the following list that there is one ancestor who is not traced.  Marguérite Dusson (1656-1731) has no documentation as to her parentage, marriage [she was married in 1671 at a church whose records start in 1675], nor where she was born.  It’s very likely she was born in France, but it’s possible it was her parents who were born there.  In either case… she’s French.

Many of the immigrant ancestors of Delia were the so-called “Filles du Roi“, Daughters of the King.  They were women of modest means who were enticed from France with a financial incentive and dowry to come to Canada and marry the male settlers of “Nouvelle France”, what we call Québec.

“The program was designed to boost Canada’s population both by encouraging male immigrants to settle there, and by promoting marriage, family formation and the birth of children.”

This is why you’ll see so many women from Paris, Normandie, and other Western parts of France among my French immigrant ancestors.

Immigrant ancestors of Cordélie Olivier (1850-1918)

Louis Olivier dit LaVictoire (1720-1785) Paris, Ile-de-France, France

Jacques Hénault (Énaud) (1627-1690) Paris, Ile-de-France, France
Marie LeRoux (1645-1717) Rouen, Normandie, France
Pierre Ratelle (1637-1688) Rouen, Normandie, France
Marie Lemaire (1648-1674) Blois, Loire et Cher, France
Pierre Genereux (1678-1742) Limoges, Limousin, France
François Dessureaux Bourguigon (1632-1688) Artun, Bourgogne, France
Marie Bouart (1649-1712) Poitiers, Normandie, France

Antoine Desrosiers (1617-1691) Drôme, Rhône-Alpes, France
Anne Leneuf Duherisson (1632-1711) Caen, Normandie, France
Jean LePellé dit Desmarais (1641-1708) Saintonge, Pictou-Charentes, France
Guillaume Isabel (1623-1652) Perche, Normandie, France
Catherine Dodier (1638-1673) Perche, Normandie, France

Nicholas Lupien dit Lafrenière (1645-1697) Champagne, Aquitaine, France
Pierre Chauvin (1635-1699) Anjou, Rhône-Alpes, France
Marthe Autreuil (1636-1714) Anjou, Rhône-Alpes, France
Jean Petit dit Bruneau (1645-1724) Paris, Ile-de-France, France
Bertrand Chesnay dit Lagarenn (1621-1683) St-Brieuc, Bretagne, France
François Belanger (1612-1686) Sées, Normandie, France
Marie Guyon (1624-1696) Mortagne, Normandie, France

René Houré dit LaFerrière (1629-1706) Tours, Indre-et-Loire, France
Denise Damané (1641-1704) Paris, Ile-de-France, France
Guilliaume Dubord dit LaFontaine (1636-1705) Limousin, Dordogne, France
Catherine Guérard (1649-1727) Paris, Ile-de-France, France

Pierre Généreux (1678-1742) Limoges, Limousin, France
François Dessureau (1631-1688) Autun, Bourgogne, France
Marie Bonard (1649-1712) Poitiers, Poitou-Charentes, France

Pierre Papin (1629-1715) Maine, Poitou-Charentes, France
Marie Anne Pelletier (1646-1686) Eure-et-Loire, Rhône-Alpes, France
Pierre Chaperon (1645-1728) Rouen, Normandie, France
Noëlle Quiremond (1640-1685) Saint-Denis, Seine-St-Denis, France

Jean Guichard (1666-1743) Vitry-le-François, Marne, France
Christophe Gerbault dit Bellegarde (1643-1695) Anjou, Rhône-Alpes, France
François Lemaistre-Lamorille dit le Picard (1631-1666) Domfront, Orne, France
Marie Judith Rigaud (1633-1703) St-Jean-d’Angély, Charante-Maritime, France

Pierre François Tellier (1663-1741) Paris, Ile-de-France, France
Gilbert LeRoux dit L’Enseigne (1641-1699) Clermont, Auvergne, France
Jaques Greslon dit Laviolette (1626-1679) St-Severin, Poitiers, France
Jeanne Vigneault (1635-1700) Brioux-sur-Boutonne, Poitou-Charentes, France

Antoine Desrosiers (1617-1691) Drôme, Rhône-Alpes, France
Anne Leneuf Duherisson (1632-1711) Caen, Normandie, France
Jean LePellé dit Desmarais (1641-1708) Saintonge, Pictou-Charentes, France
Guillaume Isabel (1623-1652) Perche, Normandie, France
Catherine Dodier (1638-1673) Perche, Normandie, France
Jean Piette dit Trempe (1641-1730) Charente, Poitou-Charantes, France
Marguérite Chemereau (1651-1715) LaRochelle, Basse-Normandie, France
Jean François Harel (1646-1716) LaRochelle, Basse-Normandie, France
Marie Pescher dite Legal (1649-1728) Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France

Gabriel Bérard (1644-1710) Le Mans, Pays de la Loire, France
Jean Hayot (1636-1713) Mortagne, Perche, France
Nicholas Pelletier (1590-1674) Beaucé, Bretagne, France
Jean DeVoisy (1612 – 1689) Beaucé, Bretagne, France

Joseph Chevalier (1644-1721) Dieppe, Normandie, France
Françoise Martha Barton (1653-1699)  Poitiers, Poitou-Charentes, France
Geoffrey Guillot dit Lavallée (1614-1665) Ruffec, Poitou-Charentes, France
Marie D’Abancour dite Lacaille (1618-1678) Cote d’Or, Bourgogne, France
Marguérite Dusson (1656-1731) Likely France.  No documentation so far.

Pierre Charron dit Ducharme (1635-1700) Meaux, Ile-de-France, France
Catherine Pillard (1646-1717) LaRochelle, Basse-Normandie, France
Jean Piette dit Trempe (1641-1730) Charente, Poitou-Charantes, France
Marguérite Chemereau (1651-1715) LaRochelle, Basse-Normandie, France

Jaques Roseau (1662-1757) LaRochelle, Basse-Normandie, France
Isaac Lemire (1650-1717) Rouen, Normandie, France
Helen Damours (1649-1699) Paris, Ile-de-France, France

Pierre Parent (1610-1698) Mortagne, Perche, France
Jeanne Badeau (1638-1706) LaRochelle, Basse-Normandie, France
Nicholas Bélanger (1638-1682) Lisieux, Normandie, France
Marie DeRainville (1644-1711) Lisieux, Normandie, France
Louis Bedard (1655-1701) LaRochelle, Basse-Normandie, France
Michel Huppé dit Lagroye (1616-1691) Alençon, Normandie, France
Madeleine Roussin (1623-1686) Tourouvre, Basse-Normandie, France

Toussaint Giroux (1633-1715) Mortagne, Perche, France
Marie Goddard (1641-1684) Mortagne, Perche, France
Paul Vachon (1530-1703) Luçon, Centre, France
Noel Langlois (1606-1684) Alençon, Basse-Normandie, France
Françoise Grenier (1610-1665) Alençon, Basse-Normandie, France
Pierre Mailloux dit Desmoulins (1631-1699) Martha, Poitou-Charentes, France
Anne DeLaunay (1641-1700) LaRochelle, Basse-Normandie, France
Pierre Marceau (1631-1699) Tonnerre, Bourgogne, France
Marthe de Rainville (1647-1721) Lisieux, Basse-Normandie, France


Mother’s Day – 2013

For Mother’s Day this year I decided to pay tribute to all the mothers in my Family Tree who contributed to making me who I am.  Of course there are tens or hundreds of thousands of women in my direct line of ancestry, if you go back to the beginning of our species.  My family tree goes back to the 1500’s in some places, to my 11x or 12x great grandparents.  As I’ve said before, that’s about 20,000 grandparents in your entire family tree to that depth.  Obviously there’s no way I can pay meaningful tribute to 10,000 women, so I decided to put together a collection of all the mothers, grandmothers, and great-grandmothers that I have photos of in my tree.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

 

Happy Mother’s Day, my beloved ancestors!

The women who made me who I am.

The women who made me who I am.