Olivier Family Photos – Part II

My cousin Micheline has spent decades working on her family genealogy.  She was kind enough to share her extensive collection of Olivier family photos with me, and she gave me permission to make them available where other members of the family could find them.  To be honest, it’s difficult for me to narrow down the more than 12 dozen photos she has sent me so far, because they are all excellent.  But I’ll do my best.  My plan is to post the main family line here, and then have separate blogs with photos from each sibling.

I am related to the Olivier family through Delia Bacon, the mother of my paternal grandfather.  Delia’s mother was Cordelia Olivier.  Micheline and I are both descendants of Cordelia’s father Henri François Olivier (1812-1876).

Micheline’s family comes from Cordelia’s brother Henri Octave Olivier (1836-1911).  Octave was born 18 Feb 1836 and baptized at La Visitation-de-l’Île-Dupas in Québec.  For most of his life he lived in Ste-Elizabeth and St-Thomas, Québec (near Montréal), but he and his family can also be found in the 1880 census for Holyoke, Massachusetts where they lived briefly, and where Octave is listed as a “Laborer”.  He died on 13 May 1911 and was buried in St-Thomas.

Henri Octave Olivier

Henri Octave Olivier

I’ve already posted a photo I purchased from eBay of Philomène Cottenoire, who was Henri’s wife.  This is a photo of Philomène as an older lady, probably taken about 1919:

Philomène Cottenoire c1919.

Philomène Cottenoire c1919.

Henri and Philomène had 13 children… seven boys and six girls.  Five of them died in infancy or early childhood.  Of the eight surviving children, I have photos of seven of them.  So far I do not have a photo of their eldest son, Joseph Philémon “Philémon” Olivier (1860-1918), who married Marie Celeste LaPorte.

The next son was Louis Dolor “Adélard” Olivier (1861-1921).  The only photo I have of him is from his funeral flyer, and it’s not very clear.  Adélard married Marie Philomène Georgianna Olivier, who was his second cousin.

Adélard Olivier

Adélard Olivier

The next surviving child was their son Joseph Hildaige “Hildaige” Olivier (1865-1952).  I posted a photo of his family in a previous blog, but here is a close-up of him and his wife, Lucie Brasseur from that photo.

Lucie & Hildaige, 1904

Lucie & Hildaige, 1904

The next child was Cordélie Catherine Olivier (1867-1907) who married Charles Perreault and lived in Burlington, Vermont.  I only have one photo of them which I’d posted previously, but here it is again:

Charles Perreault and Cordélia Olivier, 1890.

Charles Perreault and Cordélia Olivier, 1890.

Next came Marie Josephine Albina “Albina” Olivier (1869-1928), who married Joseph Charles Desroches.  I’ve already posted their wedding photo, and a photo of them with their two daughters, so here is one of Albina as a young woman that Micheline sent me.

Albina Olivier c1890

Albina Olivier c1890

The next child was Henri Octave Eugène “Eugène” Olivier (1874-1965), who married Marie Angélina Masse.  I already posted their wedding photo, so here is a photo of Eugène taken from his funeral flyer.

Eugène Olivier

Eugène Olivier

Since that’s a little grim, here’s another.  This photo shows Eugène [top row, center] with his brother-in-law Anthime Moreau [top, row left], his wife Angélina [bottom row left], his sister Albina [bottom row, center], his and his nieces Yvonne Desroches [top row, right], and Blandine Desroches [bottom row, right].

Eugène Olivier with family, 1917

Eugène Olivier with family, 1917

Next came Marie Victoria “Victoria” Olivier (1876-1945), who married the aforementioned Anthime Moreau.  Here is a lovely photo of Victoria with her family taken about 1916.

Anthime Moreau Family, 1916

Anthime Moreau Family, 1916

Back row: Joseph Jean Baptiste, Marie Blanche Délia, Marie Angélina, Marie Aurore Pamela, and Joseph Octave Philibert.  Middle row: Anthime Duplessie, Marie Elisa Herminie, Victoria Olivier, and Marie Exilda Aldéa.  Front row: Joseph Ovila Adélard, Joseph Ulric Donat, and Marie-Jeanne.

They had another son, Joseph Rolland Sylvio, who was born in 1920 after this photo was taken.

The last surviving child was Marie Evelina “Evelina” Olivier (1878-1934), who married Jean Baptiste Guillaume “William” Morrisseau.  Here is a lovely photo from their wedding on 19 Sept 1898 in Burlington, Vermont.

Mélina Oliver & William Morrisseau, 1898

Evelina Oliver & William Morrisseau, 1898

In 1906 Henri Octave Olivier and Philomène Cottenoire celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary two years early.  Here is an article from that celebration with a translation in English:

48th Wedding Anniversary Article

48th Wedding Anniversary Article

A beautiful family celebration took place last Saturday. The “Day of the Kings” at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Octave Olivier of Saint-Thomas de Joliette [Québec, Canada], on the occasion of the 48th anniversary of their marriage. One of the spouses is 69 years old and the other 67. All the children were present: Philémon from Providence, United States; Adélard and Hildège of Burlington; Eugène of Saint-Thomas de Joliette, Cordélia, wife of Mr. Ch[arle]s. Perreault of Burlington; Victoria, wife of Anthime Moreau of Berthier; Albina, Mrs. Ch[arle]s. Desroches of Joliette, and Mélina [Evelina], Mrs. C. Mousseau [Morrisseau] of Burlington. All the sons are married and of these different marriages were born 32 grandchildren, among which is a great-grand-child Blanche Baillargeon, age 2, daughter of Félix Baillargeon who is the husband of Hildège Olivier’s daughter from Burlington, VT. It was a joyful reunion because the family of Mr. Octave Olivier hasn’t gotten together in 21 years. In light of the poor health of Mr. Octave Olivier, the date of their golden wedding anniversary celebration was moved up by two years.

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About cthomas1967

Seeking to bring my ancestors out of the shadows of history and into the light. I have always been interested in history, and at a few different times I tried to do a family tree, but wasn't able to do it with the technology that was available then. On a business trip I visited the World War I Museum in Kansas City, MO and it was a very impressive establishment. While I was there I remember thinking, "Didn't my great-grandfather father fight in World War I? And wasn't his brother killed alongside him in some famous battle? I wonder if I can find out where he died." That's what started it all. View all posts by cthomas1967

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